PART 6 – JOURNALS AND PERIODICALS

This Part covers the very large field of smaller articles and other data which appear in both Infantry and other publications on the RAR. Major series are described below, with specific articles then listed under the applicable war/deployments sub-heading, each citation listing the  name of the parent journal/periodical. Where known, e-links are provided to the increasing number of such sources now becoming available on-line.

Major sources are summarised below. Others will be added as identified. Note: Some of these journals are now fully digitised, but hard copy can often be found/traded/purchased. 

 

GENERAL

Australian Army Journal (Generic entry)

Published by the Australian Army Research Centre, Canberra.

The Australian Army Journal, was first known as the Army Journal. Contributions to the journal may be made by serving members or others with an interest in the Australian Army and its activities. The Australian Army Journal commenced publication in 1948 and continued through to 1976. It was revitalised in 1999 and, while published by different entities over time (the Australian Army Research Centre as at 2021), continues to this day. Many of the articles relate directly or indirectly to the RAR. Almost every copy ever produced is now on-line at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/library/australian-army-journal 

 

Australian Defence Force Journal (ADFJ) (Generic entry). The ADFJ is an Australian Defence Force publication aimed primarily at officers and SNCOs, primarily to encourage professional development through knowledge and debate. Over time, more junior ranks have availed themselves of it with increased encouragement to do so. The first paper journal – Issue 1 – appeared in Nov/Dec 1976, the last paper edition – Issue 192 – in 2013. From that time on, all issues, including retrospective paper-based issues, became available at http://www.adfjournal.adc.edu.au/site/journal_index.asp?page=26&browseby

This site may be searched for topics/keywords/authors etc, general papers immediately below and deployment-specific papers in the following sections. The Journal added the word “Australian” to its title with Issue 86 in Jan/Feb 1991. Up to that time, it was the DFJ.

 

Australian Infantry Magazine (AIM) (Generic Entry) . The AIM is the voice of the Australian Soldier and is still going strong. In order to provide and generate free flow of information, 15,000 copies are distributed internally to Army personnel free. Every issue runs stories topical not only to our Infantry members but to all Defence Force members and military enthusiasts in general. Features include updates on current operations, the latest training, tactics, combat capabilities, personnel matters, Corps news, reviews, special features and a forum allowing readers to express their views. Produced bi-annually in Apr and Oct and published by the School of Infantry, Singleton NSW. RAR contributors and topics prominent. ISSN: 1447-5545. Another publication titled Infantry Magazine, covering the period January 1969 to April 20o3, was a predecessor to AIM. See IM entry below which will seek to list ALL published articles in due course. Where an article is campaign-specific, a second entry may be found under that heading also.

 

BREEN, Bob and McCauley, Greg – The world looking over their shoulders – Australian strategic corporals on operations in Somalia and East Timor

Land Warfare Studies Centre, Canberra, 2008

ISBN: 9780642296856

197 pages.

LWSC Working Paper No 314. This book looks closely at Australian corporals at the cutting edge of Australian peace enforcement operations in Somalia and East Timor at the end of the twentieth century. It describes and analyses their experiences seeking those that will shape military operations in the twenty-first century. Directly about predominantly RAR junior NCOs, with long-term ramifications for all future operations. Accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/sp314theworldlookingovertheirshouldersbob_breen_greg_mccauley.pdf

 

Britain at War (Generic Entry). A British Commonwealth-inclusive journal. Periodically features Australian articles. Campaign-specific articles are listed below.

 

Bulletin of The Royal Australian Regiment Foundation (Generic Entry) . This Bulletin is a publication of the RAR Foundation, headed by the Chair of the day. It addresses annually, the general business of the Foundation including stipends made, Foundation awards, and an annual update of each RAR battalion’s doings for the year of publication. Issue 34 (2016) is ABN: 31 055 902 433. Also accessible at www.rarfoundation.org.au

 

CONTACT Air Land & Sea  (Generic Entry) . A high-quality military magazine focused mainly on the day-to-day work, lives and professionalism of current-day Australian Defence Force members, including Infantry, from a boots-on-the-ground perspective and as far as possible in soldiers’ own words. CONTACT has been published four times per year since March 2004 – issues 1 to 40 in print and electronic only since March 2013. The publisher also produced an Infantry-only special issue in 2008, to coincided with and celebrate the RA Inf 60th anniversary. It, and many other issues, feature the RAR. CONTACT Air Land and Sea is available by free subscription via www.aussiecombat.com

 

COMBAT Camera . A high-quality military magazine where the photos tell the thousand/million words of the contemporary Australian Defence Force stories including RAR subjects. COMBAT Camera, from the same publisher as CONTACT Air Land & Sea, was initially published four times per year (issue 1 to 14) but is now a ‘special events’ magazine, published when justified (e.g. ANZAC Day 2016 and Avalon Airshow 2017). COMBAT Camera is available via the same free subscription – www.aussiecombat.com

 

Combat Arms (Generic Entry) . A commercial publication, it frequently contains articles on RAR matters.

 

Command – Observations and Issues from Army Operations

Centre for Army Lessons, Land Warfare Centre, Puckapunyal VIC, 2006

ISBN: Nil – RESTRICTED

A series written for commanders. Also has a website http://wdc.sov.defence.gov.au/cal

This edition refers to AUSBATTs (Timor) and SECDETS (Iraq), both of which represent most RAR battalions.

 

Command – Insights from Army Operations and Selected Articles

Centre for Army Lessons, Land Warfare Centre, Puckapunyal VIC, 2008

ISBN: Nil – RESTRICTED

A series written for commanders. Also has a website http://wdc.sov.defence.gov.au/cal

This edition refers to Infantry operations in Somalia, Rwanda, Iraq, Afghanistan and the Solomons. which involved most RAR battalions.

 

CULLINAN, PA – Duntroon and Adventurous Training

In The Duntroon Society, Issue 2/2021, pp 8-20. ISSN 2207-0400.

This paper presents a history of the many Adventurous training exercises undertaken by RMC cadets and staff. Author himself and many cadet and staff were/are RAR members. Accessible at https://www.dunsoc.com/viewnewsletter?issue=2-2021-web

 

Duty First (DF) (Generic Entry) . DF is an RAR publication aimed at all ranks of the regiment. Produced by the NSW branch of the RAR Association on behalf of the RAR Corporation and all state branches. Most articles within it address current or recent deployments, training and news of interest. Publisher is One Time Publishing, Wonoona NSW. Volume 1 started in July 1970. There were no Contents pages prior to Volume 4 Number 8 (October 1976).

 

First (F) (Generic Entry). An annual 1 RAR unit production; known issues include 1980-81.

 

FRAME, Tom – Conscription, conscience and conflict – a century reflection on the 1916 referendum

In Sabretache, Volume LVII (57) – Number 4 – December 2016, pp 4-12. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

Addresses conscription which helped populate all RAR battalions during the Vietnam war. 1 RAR is specifically mentioned. Accessible at https://www.mhsa.org.au/download/sabretache-vol-lvii-no-4-december-2016/?wpdmdl=2048&_wpdmkey=62035454ea776&refresh=62035454eb9181644385364

 

GREVILLE, Phil – The unfinished story of Slim Madden, George Cross. In Duty First Vol 2, Mar 1996, p 9.

Story of Private Madden, GC of 3 RAR who perished under captivity at the hands of the North Korean/Chinese forces. Also published under the Australian Dictionary of Biographies. Accessible at https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/madden-horace-william-slim-11030

 

HARTIGAN, Brian (Ed) – CONTACT Air Land & Sea magazine

Contact Publishing Pty Ltd, Minnamurra, NSW, 2004 and ongoing

ISSN: 1449-2385  

Excellent illustrations, index in both print and e-publication formats, average 84 pages. CONTACT magazine, launched in March 2004, is a features-based military magazine with an in-depth reporting remit, focused on military operations, exercises, equipment, military activities and ‘all things of interest to soldiers, sailors and aviators’. CONTACT magazine is dedicated to presenting photos and stories that capture the essence of serving-members’ lives and interests, as far as possible from insider perspectives.  CONTACT newsletters are sent to subscribers every Sunday, alternating between news one fortnight and ‘people’ the next. CONTACT web site is an active news, features and interests-based web site, updated daily.  Managing Editor Brian Hartigan served for 12 years as a full-time soldier in the Australian Army (enlisting in November 1990), followed by 15 years in the Active Reserve reaching the rank of sergeant. He proudly deployed on Operation Warden in 1999 as an ARMY Newspaper reporter – and, in 2003, as a force-assigned civilian on the first Australian Federal Police rotation to the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) as a photographer.  Visit www.militarycontact.com for details, or subscribe via www.aussiecombat.com . Access and subscription is free.

 

HARTIGAN, Brian (Ed – COMBAT Camera magazine

Contact Publishing Pty Ltd, Minnamurra, NSW, 2004 and ongoing

Excellent illustrations, index e-publication format. This product parallels CONTACT Air Land & Sea magazine and is similarly free to subscribe to. Visit www.militarycontact.com for details, or subscribe via www.aussiecombat.com

 

HASSETT, General Sir Francis – The Field Marshal Blamey Memorial Oration in US, Vol 47, No 1, (Winter 1993). This article addresses Hassett’s time as CO 3 RAR in Korea and then with 28th Commonwealth Brigade in Malaya.

 

HINDS, Lieutenant Colonel S – Man at the top – a short biography of General FG HASSETT AC, CB, DSO, MVO

 In Australian Army Journal, No 319, pp 3-15, December 1975. One of the senior RAR tribal leaders, Hassett served at each command level in the RAR and then commanded at brigade, division, Army and Defence Force levels. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_319_dec_1975.pdf

 

Helping All That Served (HATS) (Generic Entry)

Privately managed and published

ISBN: Nil 

HATS is both the name and motto of the Integrated Service people’s Association of Australia, an ex-service organisation dedicated to assisting the veteran community and also current serving members of the ADF. Services include assistance with preparation of claims for service, disability and war widows/ers claims, welfare assistance and gaining many other entitlements from the Department of Veterans Affairs. HATS  is published three times a year; March, July, November. Some editions (over 40 to date) feature the RAR. These are both printed, and accessible through http://rnzaf.proboards.com/thread/15992/hats-journal-integrated-servicepeople-oz

 

HINDS, Lieutenant Colonel S – Man at the top: General FG HASSETT AC, CB, DSO, MVO

In Sabretache, Volume 17 – Number 2 – December 1975; pp 94-99. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

 

Infantry Information Letters  (Generic Entry). Generated by the Directorate of Infantry for many years, this now-defunct source of valuable information enabled the rapid dissemination of information of Infantry information at a time when the publication of pamphlets took substantially longer. Most articles affected the RAR.

 

Infantry Magazine (IM) (Generic Entry). This magazine was published by the Head of Corps RA Inf from January 1969 to April 2003 and was replaced by the Australian Infantry Magazine (see above). Specific papers are listed in this Part.

 

  Journal of the Australian War Memorial

Australian War Memorial, Canberra

ISSN: 1327-0141

Online summary of this publication series. Issues 1 to 27 were published in hard copy, with 28 to 40 online. The latter publications are at the website listed at https://www.awm.gov.au/articles/journal. Many contain articles on the RAR. Publication have been temporarily discontinued for the reasons stated on the website. Their re-introduction date is not yet known (as at 4 Jun 21).

 

 Kapyong Kronicle (KK) (Generic Entry) . An annual 3 RAR unit publication.

 

KEOGH, EG, MBE, ED (Editor) – The Pentropic Division

In Australian Army Journal, No 129, February 1960. This entire edition was devoted to the (then) new doctrine of the pentropic division, a structure that subsumed the RARs at the time, and to which they switched while in Australia and then converting to a different organisation when deployed to SE Asia. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_129_feb_1960.pdf

 

LINWOOD, RJ Captain – Put your head in the sand – here comes their armour

In DFJ, No 1, November 1976, pp 25-34. A paper on anti-armour operations by Australians post- World War II up to 1976. Mentions 3 RAR which has the last Australian Army unit to destroy an enemy AFV (a North Korean T38-85 tank in Korea) and 5/7 RAR.

 

LINWOOD, RJ – The Sniper – Part 1

In IM, Vol XX, Number 2, July-December 1980, pp 9-20. Covers the selection, preparation and training of military snipers based on the re-introduction of sniping to the Australian Army as an official sponsored skill in 1976. The author was responsible for this work at the Infantry Centre, relying on two Australian Senior NCOs who had completed the UK sniper course, two exchange senior NCOs (UK and USMC) and book research; there were no serving Australian personnel with real sniping experience at the time.

 

LINWOOD, RJ – The Sniper – Part 2

In IM, Vol XXI, Number 1, January-June 1981, pp 6-10. Covers the operational deployment of military snipers. Since the re-introduction of sniping to the Australian Army in 1976, snipers have been employed in every deployment since, including by Special Forces whose first groups of snipers and sniper instructors were first trained at the Infantry Centre by the author and his team.

 

Lieutenant General A.L. MacDonald CB, OBE Chief of the General Staff

In Australian Army Journal, No 319, pp 16, December 1975. One of the senior RAR tribal leaders, MacDonald served at every level in the RAR before moving on to higher command. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_319_dec_1975.pdf

 

PAYNE, WO2, R – Everything you always wanted to know about forced marching and were too afraid to ask

In Defence Force Journal No 78, September/October 1978, pp 47-50.

Possibly a tongue in cheek, but accurate, treatise on forced marching, something every RAR solider has done and probably will continue to. See paper at https://defence.gov.au/adc/adfj/Documents/issue_78/78_1989_Sep_Oct.pdf

 

Sabretache (ST) (Generic Entry)

Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra (published continuously since 1958)

MHSA often has articles that include the RAR.  Online access to such articles is now available at https://www.mhsa.org.au/sabretache/ which covers every edition from 1958 to 2001. Hard copy editions from that date are widely available. All remaining hard copy editions have now also been digitised and are planned to be added to those already on the MHSA website during 2021. Specific RAR entries are progressively added in their respective campaign/deployment sections that follow. General papers that cover more than one operational period include:

 

SHAW, Peter – The evolution of the Infantry state regimental system in the Army Reserve

In Sabretache, Volume LXI (51) – Number 3 – September 2010, pp 45-46. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

Describes the evolution of the Army Reserve battalions that preceded and then served alongside their ARA counterparts. Every one of these battalions included RAR cadre officers and NCOS, comprising the Adjutant, Quartermaster, RSM, RQMS, Chief Clerk and training and administrative specialist WO/SGT/junior NCOs. Accessible at  https://www.mhsa.org.au/download/sabretache-vol-li-no-3-december-2010/?wpdmdl=1962&_wpdmkey=62034e2fd0162&refresh=62034e2fd152b1644383791

 

Smart Soldier (SS) (Generic Entry)

Centre for Army Lessons (CAL), Army Knowledge Group, Puckapunyal VIC

ISBN: Nil

47 editions as at Feb 17, with 2-3 published annually on average.

Each edition has a range of articles, almost all of which apply to RAR, some mention units/sub-units. One of an increasing number of in-service products that encourage interactivity with serving soldiers.

 

The Duntroon Society (Generic Entry). Published twice yearly and features articles by and/or about Duntroon and its graduates. Since the demise of other officer training institutions, The Duntroon Society has become the centrepiece journal for commissioned officer of the Australian Army. Most editions carry papers that deal with the RAR or RAR members. Papers of specific RAR interest are listed below. Access via any of them also allows the researcher to tap into every digital copy. 

 

The First Post (Generic Entry) . Published annually by the Association of the First Infantry Battalions – The First Post: Journal of the Association of First Infantry Battalions is a periodical more newsworthy than intended to carry formal papers or articles, this publication includes Volume 34 as at Jul 1999. Not known to be digitised, might be found in current RAR Association archives. Very useful for identifying personalities, both serving and retired, who worked to protect the interests of battalions carrying the numeral 1, including 1RAR. See also ‘First’ which was produced by the actual unit 1 RAR.

 

Vietnam (V) (Generic Entry) . A magazine comprising papers and articles of the war in Vietnam. Relevant publications are found in the Part.

 

Tiger Tales (TT) (Generic Entry). A regular 5 RAR Association publication. See http://www.5rar.asn.au/tt-archives/tt_archive.htm

 

Wartime (W)  (Generic Entry)

Australian War Memorial, Canberra, ongoing

ISBN: TBA

This periodical often contains articles relevant to the RAR. Current research will result in the listing of all  articles relevant to the RAR.

 

United Service (US) (Generic Entry)

Journal of the RUSI (NSW), Sydney. Contains many papers of value and relevance to the RAR researcher.

 

  

JAPAN AND KOREA 1946-1953

  

Anonymous – Regimental journal of 11 National Service Training Battalion (We serve)

Self-published unit journal, Wacol QLD, 1954-55

This unit publication came out twice yearly and included details on many staff and members who served/went on to serve in the RAR.

 

ARGENT, Lieutenant A, – Armoured operations in Korea

In Australian Army Journal, No 35, April 1952. Includes references to 3 RAR.

 

Australian Army Journal Editorial Staff – Battle of Kapyong

In Australian Army Journal, No 59, April 1954. Addresses the famous battle involving 3 RAR and others.

 

BARTLETT, Norman – The Battle of Kapyong from With the Australians in Korea

In Australian Army Journal, No 263, April 1971. Based on the parent publication and shaped for publication in AAJ. 3 RAR fought this battle in Korea.

 

COURTENAY, William – Lessons from Korea 

In Australian Army Journal, No 32, January 1952. Includes coverage of infantry operations carried out by the RAR.

 

CRAWFORD, Captain JJ – Korean Ambush 

In Australian Army Journal, No 46, March 1953. Pp 5-10. Describes a successful major ambush involving 3 RAR in Korea. Article is accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_046_mar_1953_0.pdf

 

Director of Infantry AHQ – Operation Commando

In Australian Army Journal, No 34, March 1952. Operation Commando occurred during October 1951 and involved 3 RAR whose involvement is better known as the Battle for Maryang-san.  This is a remarkable publication given the short time between the battle and publication.

 

HOPTON, Major LI – Maintenance of an Australian Infantry Battalion in Korea

In Australian Army Journal, No 25, June 1951. Refers to 3 RAR.

 

Korean Operations: 3 RAR Raid on Hill 227 – 25 January 1952 in ADFJ, No 157 (Nov/Dec 02) pp 37-45.

 

LANGTRI, Major JO – Tactical implications of the human factors in warfare

In Australian Army Journal, No 108, May 1958. Refers to the RAR in Korea.

 

PICKETT, Lieutenant Colonel George B – Tanks in defence in Korea

In Australian Army Journal, No 31, December 1951. Refers to the RAR battalions there at the time and how tanks worked in support.

 

ROWELL, Lieutenant General Sir Sydney – Lessons from Korea

In Australian Army Journal, No 52, September 1953. Pp 5-8. Mentions 3 RAR in a general high level short paper. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_052_sep_1953_0.pdf

 

SMITH, LTCOL Neil C Smith, AM – Soldiers of BCOF

In Sabretache, Volume LXI (51) – Number 4 – December 2010, pp 5-12. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

Brief paper on the formation and outline duties of BCOF which included the battalions that became 1, 2 and 3 RAR. Accessible at https://www.mhsa.org.au/download/sabretache-vol-li-no-3-september-2010/?wpdmdl=1961&_wpdmkey=62034c3a459b7&refresh=62034c3a473941644383290

 

The Battle of Kapyong

In Army Journal, No 263 (Apr 71), pp 3-24.

Narrative of 3 RAR’s major battle of the Korean war.

 

Van TONDER, Gerry – Against the red tide (Part 1)

Key Publishing Ltd (Britain at War), Stamford UK, 2020

ISSN: 1753-3090

Article in Britain at War, June 2020, Issue 158, pp 70-77. Colour and black and white images.

Charts the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade’s service in the Korean War, covering 3 RAR and the Battle of Kapyong in the process.

 

Van TONDER, Gerry – Against the red tide (Part II)

Key Publishing Ltd (Britain at War), Stamford UK, 2020

ISSN: 1753-3090

Article in Britain at War, July 2020, Issue 159, pp 64-74. Colour and black and white images, map.

Completes the story of the 27th British Commonwealth Brigade’s service in the Korean War, covering 3 RAR and the Battle of Kapyong, and the subsequent creation of 28th British Commonwealth Brigade that included 1 or 2 RAR on tours of duty, and 3 RAR throughout, until the end of the war.

 

WILLIS, Major JW – The British Commonwealth Occupation Force

In Australian Army Journal, No 81, February 1956. BCOF included all three battalions that constituted the RAR – 1, 2 and 3 RAR.

 

SOUTH EAST ASIA 1950-current

(includes Malaya, Borneo, Singapore & Malaysia)

 

Anonymous – Rifle Company Butterworth Rotation 126

In AIM Issue 2-2019, pp 46-50.

Populist general article on a 2019 rotation of B Coy 8/9 RAR as RCB126 in Malaysia out of Air Base Butterworth. Fundamental error in first sentence; stating that this rotation was 50 years since 8 RAR served in Malaysia as part of the ‘British Commonwealth Occupation Force’ in 1967. 8 RAR served in Malaysia as part of the FESR prior to deployment to Vietnam. BCOF was in Japan 1945-52 where 1,2 and 3 RAR were officially formed from their predecessor units.

 

Army Headquarters General Staff – Exercise Grand Slam lessons

In Australian Army Journal, No 125, October 1959. Refers to the RAR.

 

ARNISON, Captain PM – Civic action in Vietnam 1965-66

In Australian Army Journal, No 220, September 1967, pp 3-7. Addresses supplementary efforts by the Australian forces in Vietnam early in its involvement in that war including those by 1 RAR which, a the time was under command the 173rd Airborne Brigade (US). Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_220_sep_1967.pdf

 

BENVENUTI, Andrea and JONES, David Martin – Engaging Southeast Asia? Labor’s regional mythology and Australia’s military withdrawal from Singapore and Malaysia 1972-1973

Journal of Cold War Studies, Vol 12, No 4, Fall, 2010 pp 32-62

Covers the period  when 6 RAR was the Australian RAR contribution to 28 ANZUK Brigade in Singapore and provided companies to Air Base Butterworth.

 

CHADWICK, Justin – The atomic division: the Australian army pentropic experiment, 1969-1965

In Australian Army Journal, Volume XVII, Number 1, pp 45-60.

Published by the Australian Army Research Centre, Canberra.

ISSN (Print) 1448-2843

ISSN (Digital) 2200-0992

Describes the Australian experience with pentropic division which included 1,2 and 3 RAR at the time. 1 RAR is specifically mentioned in this paper.

Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/21875%20Defence%20-%20Army%20Journal%20Volume%20XVII_1.pdf

 

EAST, MBE Lieutenant Colonel CHA – Seskoad: a unique experience

 In Australian Army Journal, No 200, February 1966. p 3-9. Author, who served with 1 RAR in Korea, and later in Malaya, gives an account of his time at the Indonesian staff college.  Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_200_jan_1966.pdf 

 

FLETCHER, J – Peacetime soldiering in Malaya

In AAJ, No 163, December 1962, pp 5 – 13.

Addresses 2 RAR’s experience in 1960-61 following its tour of duty in Malaya 1957-59  after which it converted to a pentropic division structure and then re-geared for further deployment to Malaya followed by post-deployment training and readiness for the future. Online at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_163_dec_1962_0.pdf

 

GARLAND, Major RS – Strategic Review-Stalemate on 38th Parallel – An Consantoir, Eire – Operations in Malaya

In Australian Army Journal, No 119, April 1959. Refers to the RAR.

 

HARUN, A.L & SAUDI, N.S.M – The concept of security and development: Malaysia’s successful approach towards bringing down insurgency in the 1970-1980s

In International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Vol 10, No.8, 2020, pp 1066-1075.

Authors are from the National Defence University of Malaysia. They confirm the conduct of the war officially called the Communist Insurgency in Malaysia 1978-1989. They also use the terms ‘Second Emergency’ and ‘Malaysian Second Counter Insurgency of 1968-1989’. This paper covers the war in robust academic research terms and mentions the RMAF bombing of CT hide-outs among the various security force operational efforts to succeed in ending the insurgency. Also refers to the Malayan Emergency 1948-60 during which 1, 2 and 3 RAR served. 4 RAR also served between 1960 and the restart of the CIM. All RARs then served in the COM 68-89 through the provision of rifle companies to serve as RCBs at ABB.

 

NIESSL, Richard (LTCOL) – Rifle Company Butterworth 1970-2020: Origins, Role and Future Possibilities

In AAJ, Volume XVI, Number 2, pp 81-102.

A paper covering the deployments of RCB rifle companies to Air Base Butterworth since Nov 70 during which 202 such companies (as at Feb 21) have deployed, the great majority being RAR.

 

ROSENZWEIG, Paul – In our neighbours’ soil our Anzacs sleep. 

In Sabretache, Volume LXII, Number 1 – March 2021, pp 24-33. Addresses the Australian war dead from the Malayan Emergency and Confrontation wars. Includes nominal rolls for both campaigns that include 1, 2, 3 and 4 RAR members.

 

ROBERTS, Lieutenant Colonel JB – Movement and Supply by Jungle River

In Australian Army Journal, No 138, November 1960. Refers to initial RAR operations in Malaya.

 

STRETTON, AB LTCOL – On active service in Malaya

In AAJ, No 165, February 1963, pp 10 – 20.

Online at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_165_feb_1963_0.pdf

Deals with anti – CT operations by 2 RAR from 1 Aug 62 on the THAI border in the states of Kedah and Perlis in conjunction with Malayan and Thai forces.

 

WALKER, General Sir Walter – How Borneo was won

In Australian Army Journal, No 244, September 1969. Covers the Borneo campaign in which 3 RAR and 4 RAR fought.

 

WEICHONG, Ong – Between safe havens in cross-border insurgency: Malaysia, Thailand and the Second Emergency (1952–89)

Taylor Francis Online, 2020

Published online in Small wars and Insurgencies, Volume 31, Issue 6. Accessible at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09592318.2019.1698176?needAccess=true

 From a local insurgent movement in the Malayan Emergency (1948–60), the Communist Party of Malaya (CPM) transitioned into a cross-border one in the Second Emergency (1968–89). This article shows how the CPM insurgency transitioned from a local one in Peninsular Malaysia to a protracted cross border conflict with a safe haven in Southern Thailand. This article also addresses how Malaysia, the counterinsurgent state dealt with the unique set of challenges associated with a cross-border insurgency that was subject to the ebb and flow ‘good neighbourly’ relations with Thailand. Finally, this article examines the negotiation process and how the lessons learnt from the failure of the Baling Peace Talks in 1955 were translated into an enduring peace at Haadyai in 1989. RAR units operated in the border area 1960-1966 against this enemy, and from 1970 to 1989, served at Air Base Butterworth in a protective role.

 

WEICHONG, Ong and RAMAKRISHNA, Kumer – The Second Emergency (1968-1989): a reassessment of CPM’s armed revolution

RSIS Commentaries (2013)

ISBN: N/A

3-page article

Research article in Publication No 191 that addresses the Communist Terrorist threat, including that faced by RAR company groups tasked to protect RAAF assets and personnel at RAAF/RMAF Air Base Butterworth 1970-1989.

 

 

VIETNAM 1962-1975

 

ATKINSON, Major DK – Vietnam – the unwinnable war?

In Australian Army Journal, No 253, June 1970. All RAR served in Vietnam, experiences varying with respect to this perspective.

 

Australian Embassy Guard Platoon, Saigon – military units and formations established in 1972

Google-info

 This sub-unit existed during 1972-3 at the end of the Australian commitment to the Vietnam War and comprised about 50 soldiers during its existence. Most were RAR members. See https://en.google-info.org/57139365/1/australian-embassy-guard-platoon-saigon.html

 

Australian Embassy Guard Platoon, Saigon

Wikipedia

The last troops to serve in Vietnam was this sub-unit which was based on RAR members. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Embassy_Guard_Platoon,_Saigon

 

BOURKE, 2nd Lieutenant, J.R – Platoon organisation, rations and equipment

In Australian Army Journal No 208, September 1966, pp 5-11.

Based on his service with 1 RAR in Vietnam, the author addresses these fundamental components of the RAR building block – the rifle platoon. Paper accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_208_sep_1966.pdf

 

BURNS, Major PR – Chieu Hoi: the bloodless war

In Australian Army Journal, No 240, May 1969. Addresses the surrender program in Vietnam. All RAR battalions will have experienced it during their tours of duty.

 

CHAMBERLAIN, Max – The Digger in Asia

Vol XXXIII Oct-Dec 1992 Number 4, Bibliography; 51 pages.

A date by date chronological list of events post-world war to 25 Apr 91, frequently listing RAR units. Previously published as Asian Battle Diary in 1968, 1969 and 1974.

 

CHERRIE, Stanley – A Huey Gunship’s Wild Duel

Leesburg VA (USA), 2009

ISBN/ISSN: TBA

Cherrie publishes an account on Pp 28-35 of the February 2009 edition of Vietnam magazine in which he flew a Huey gunship mission in support of A Coy 3 RAR on 1 Feb 68 at Ba Ria during the Tet Offensive. He later met up with the beneficiary of the strike, then-MAJ Hori Howard, OC A Coy 3 RAR.

 

DRAYTON, Major Andrew – A re-evaluation of the role of the Australian Task Force in Vietnam

In Australian Defence Force Journal, No 133, Nov/Dec 1998. Reviews 1 ATF in Vietnam which was primarily made up of RAR battalions. 1 RAR’s time with 173rd Airborne Brigade (US) is also mentioned. Accessible at https://defence.gov.au/adc/adfj/Documents/issue_133/133_1998_Nov_Dec.pdf

 

EKINS, Ashley – To save a village

In Wartime, Australian War Memorial, Issue No. 75 (Winter 2016), pp 10-21. Story of enemy infiltration which challenged the Australian forces at Binh Ba to a ferocious battle on 6-8 Jun 69 involving 5 RAR and 6 RAR.

GARLAND, Lieutenant Colonel R.S.- Search and clear operations

In Australian Army Journal No 208, September 1966, pp 29-46.

This paper addresses these operations from a conceptual perspective and refers to 1 RAR’s application in particular in in South Vietnam. Paper accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_208_sep_1966.pdf

 

GARLAND, Lieutenant Colonel AB – The first Viet Cong general offensive

In Australian Army Journal, No 240, May 1969, pp24-36. Covers the Tet Offensive and refers to 3 RAR and 7 RAR. Accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_240_may_1969_0.pdf

 

GARLAND, Lieutenant Colonel AB – The second Viet Cong general offensive

In Australian Army Journal, No 241, June 1969, pp 11-22. Follows on from the The first Viet Cong general offensive in No 204.  Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_241_jun_1969_0.pdf

 

GOWER, Steve – Forward Observer

In Wartime, Australian War Memorial, Issue No. 75 (Winter 2016), pp 32-39. Story of an Artillery Forward Observer’s (FO) role in Vietnam serving a vital fire support role; every RAR rifle company had an FO and party with them to direct fire required by the rifle company commander. Author served as an FO in Vietnam in 1966-67 primarily with 5 RAR and 6 RAR.

 

GRAHAM DSO, OBE, MC Brigadier SC – Observations on operations in Vietnam

In Australian Army Journal, No 235, December 1967. Mentions several RAR battalions which formed the bulk of the Australian ground commitment to Vietnam.

 

HUNTER, Claire – A Ferocious Fight: Battle of Binh Ba

Key Publishing Ltd (Britain at War), Stamford UK, 2019

ISSN: 1753-3090

Article in Britain at War, September 2019, pp 16-22. Colour and black and white images.

Addresses the Battle of Binh Ba. Mentions both 5 and 6 RAR.Over thirty-five years ago the CIA and the Pentagon invited Ted Serong, an Australian soldier, to advise them on the conduct of the war in Vietnam. This is Ted Serong’s story of that war. Serong grew to have influence at the highest levels of government in America and South Vietnam. Sponsored by the CIA, he turned a relatively minor assignment into the development of a program for the war against the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong in particular, and for the world-wide struggle against Communism in general.

 

HOWARD, BW (Hori) AO, MC, ESM, MAJGEN (Retd) – The Battle for Ba Ria 1-2 Feb 68 (Part 1)

Big Sky Publishing, Newport, 2012

ISSN: 1447-5545

Part 1 (of 2) was published in the Australian Infantry Magazine (AIM) Oct 11 – Apr 12 on pp 76-87 at the request of the School of Infantry. Includes A Coy 3 RAR and D Coy 4 RAR. One of very few Australian urban terrain engagements of the Vietnam War.

 

HOWARD, BW (Hori) AO, MC, ESM, MAJGEN (Retd) – The Battle for Ba Ria 1-2 Feb 68 (Part 2)

Part 2 (of 2) was published in the AIM Apr 12 – Oct 12 on pp 72 – 84 at the request of the School of Infantry. Includes A Coy 3 RAR and D Coy 4 RAR. One of very few Australian urban terrain engagements of the Vietnam War. This part includes an interview by the Australian Military Historian Ian McNeill with the Commander of D445, the enemy opponent.

 

HUTCHINSON, Ian – The ‘Red Rats’ and Phuoc Tuy

In AAJ, No 227, April 1968 and also reprinted in AAJ, Vol V, No 1, Autumn 2008, pp 133-155. Mentions 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 RAR from the establishment of 1st Australian Task Force onwards to 1967. Addresses the geography, interaction of the Australian forces with US and ARVN forces, local government authorities, and operations against the enemy. The term ‘Red Rats’ was coined by the Vietnamese who had little to no concept of a kangaroo.

 

JAMIESON, Mark – A FO (Ack) in Vietnam 7 RAR FSB Coral 102 Fd Bty C/S 11A

Vol LVII, Dec 2016, Number 4; Bibliography; 12 pages.

An account of artillery support by 102 Field Battery to 7 RAR at Fire Support Base Coral in 1968.

 

JAMIESON, Mark- 365 and a Wakey

Self-published 2013

ISBN: Nil

Illustrated, maps, references; 179 pages.

 The story of Larry D’Arcy, Royal Australian Artillery, who served in Malay and Vietnam in support of several RARs  including 1 and 3 RAR in Vietnam which are mentioned in the story. Accessible at http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.1016.1901&rep=rep1&type=pdf

 

JAMIESON, Mark – Callsign 11 Alpha: a soldier’s perspective in Vietnam

In Oral History Australian Journal, No 3, 2016, pp 23-38. Story of John Hams, a Forward Observer Assistant (FO Ack) with 102 Field Battery, 12 Field Regiment in Vietnam Mar 68 to Feb 69 in support of 7 RAR which is mentioned in this article. Paper accessible at https://oralhistoryaustralia.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016_journal_full.pdf

 

JAMIESON, Mark – Call sign 11 Alpha: An FO (Ack) in Vietnam

In Sabretache, Volume LVII (57) – Number 4 – December 2016, pp 35-42. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

Story of John Harms, RAA who served as an FO (Ack) in Vietnam. Their prime task was to support the battalions; 1 and 7 RAR are mentioned in this excellent coverage of how the gunner FO parties operated to deliver that vital support for which every RAR veteran would express great appreciation. Accessible at https://www.mhsa.org.au/download/sabretache-vol-lvii-no-4-december-2016/?wpdmdl=2048&_wpdmkey=62035454ea776&refresh=62035454eb9181644385364

 

JAMIESON, Mark – Fire Support Patrol Base (FSPB) Coral remembered

In Sabretache, Volume LX (50) – Number 4 – December 2014, pp 17-31. Published by the Military Historical Society of Australia, Canberra.

Covers the Battle for FSPB Coral over the period 12 May – 6 Jun 68. Includes 1, 2 and 3 RAR. Accessible at https://www.mhsa.org.au/download/sabretache-vol-lv-no-4-december-2014/?wpdmdl=2010&_wpdmkey=6203511b66977&refresh=6203511b67a031644384539

 

JANS, Brigadier Nick – Vietnam War Memoir

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 173-179.

Author writes this piece in a manner whereby any RAR veteran of the Vietnam War can immediately identify with the nuances of the day to day experiences at the time. Does not mention any RAR, but it is clearly through the senses of the combat soldier that this work resonates. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_1.pdf

 

JOHNSON, Len – Operation Lavarack: Phuoc Tuy Province Vietnam 1969

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 89-113.

Operation LAVARACK was an ambushing and reconnaissance-in-force operation conducted by 6 RAR-NZ in Area of Operations (AO) Vincent in Phuoc Tuy Province from 30 May to 1 July 1969. During thirty-two days of continuous patrolling and ambushing, 6RAR-NZ defeated in battle two main force regiments and a district company, hundreds of enemy bunkers, disrupted the Viet Cong administrative system by denying the enemy his vital lines of communication and supply, and irreparably damaged the military and political position of the Viet Cong. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_2.pdf

 

MAIZEY, SJ (Colonel) – G2 OPS V 1 Australian Task Force Vietnam 1967

In Duty First, Vol 2, No 8, 1999.

Article addresses the duties and experiences of the author, himself a member of the RAR at the time, during the Vietnam War in this role. Mentions the RARs in-country at the time.

 

MANERA, Brad – Recall of the Saigon Guard: The Last Slouch Hats in Vietnam

In Wartime (23): (2003).Illustrated, 19 pages. Story of the platoon tasked to guard the Australian Embassy in Saigon. This sub-unit was predominantly made up of RAR soldiers.

 

McAULAY, Lex – Found and Lost: The Buried Secrets for Victory in Vietnam?

In Vietnam Magazine, October 2007, pp. 28-35. McAulay, a linguist who was posted to 1 RAR when it was under command U.S. 173d Airborne Brigade writes about the capture during Operation Crimp, in January 1966, of the files of the Communist headquarters for the area that included Saigon. He believes that if this information had been properly exploited, the Communist infrastructure in the Saigon area could have been so crippled that the Tet Offensive of 1968 would not have been possible.

 

MacFARLING, Wing Commander Ian – New Zealand and the Vietnam conflict

In Defence Force Journal, No 79, November/December 1989.

Addresses the New Zealand commitment to the Vietnam War, referring to the ANZAC battalions in which at least one rifle company was NZ. An NZ gun battery was maintained for most of the war, firing in support of all RARs.

 

McDONAGH, Lieutenant Colonel JF – Civil Affairs in Phuoc Tuy Province, South Vietnam 1967/68

In Australian Army Journal, No 231, August 1968, pp 3-15.

Covers operations of the Civil Affairs function in support of 1st ATF operations in Vietnam which at the time included 2 RAR and 7 RAR. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_231_aug_1968_0.pdf

 

McDONAGH, Lieutenant Colonel JF – Suoi Nghe – a refugee hamlet in Vietnam

In Australian Army Journal, No 232, September, 1968, pp 12-23.

Follow on article to Civil Affairs in Phuoc Tuy Province, South Vietnam 1967/68 (in AAJ 232, Aug 68) that addresses a specific operation in the 1st ATF area. Refers to 2 RAR and 7 RAR and Operation Ballarat. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_232_sep_1968_0.pdf

 

McNEILL, Ian – Vietnam 1967: Operation Bribie

In Wartime, Australian War Memorial, Issue No. 1, November 1967, pp 35-42. Story of the operation in Vietnam which, in the opinion of the author, was the closest to a major battlefield defeat for Australian troops on the Vietnam War. 6 RAR were involved.

 

McNEILL, IG (Major) – An outline of the Australian military involvement in Vietnam, July 1962 – December 1972

In Defence Force Journal, No 24, September/October 1980.

Outlines Australia’s experiences and operations from an Army perspective, mentioning all RAR battalions. Author served with the RAR there. Good executive summary. Accessible at https://defence.gov.au/adc/adfj/Documents/issue_24/24_1980_Sep_Oct.pdf

 

NICOL, JD – Morale of the Australian Infantry in South Vietnam, 1965-1972

In British Army Review, No 127 (Summer 2001): 37-48.

A paper that specifically addresses the varying states of morale of RAR battalions’ members while serving in the Vietnam War.

 

O’NEILL, Robert – Knowing the Enemy

In Wartime, Australian War Memorial, Issue No. 75 (Winter 2016), pp 21-31. Story of the vital role of intelligence in the Vietnam War. Author was the 5 RAR Intelligence Officer in Phuoc Tuy, 1966-1967.

 

PHILLIPS MC, Major, PR – The camp of Tran Van Hoang

In Australian Army Journal, No 255, August 1970. Recounted experience of the author who served as a company commander in 3 RAR at the time this paper was written. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_255_aug_1970.pdf

 

SHARP, Major PG – Battalion resupply Vietnam style

In Australian Army Journal, No 210, November 1966. Addresses the issues faced by RAR battalions in a CRW environment, in this case, Vietnam.

 

SMITH DSO, Colonel EH – Command and control in battle

In Australian Army Journal, No 240, May 1969. Addresses operations in Vietnam which centred on the RAR battalions.

 

SUTTON MC, Major RF – Notes on company operations in Vietnam

In Australian Army Journal, No 262, March 1971. Author writes of company level operations at a time by which all nine RAR battalions had served in Vietnam. This article was heavily studied in officer training in the years to follow.

 

WARR, Lieutenant Colonel JA – Cordon and search operations in Phuoc Tuy

In Australian Army Journal, No 222, November 1967. Describes 5 RAR operations in particular. Accessible at https://www.5rar.asn.au/pdf/Cordon-and-Search-Operations-in-Phuoc-Tuy-Province.pdf where it was re-published by the 5 RAR Association.

 

WILLBANK, James H – Reconsidering the 1968 Tet Offensive

In AAJ, Vol V, No 1, Autumn 2008, pp 7-18. A review of the main 1968 series of battles in Vietnam known as the Tet Offensive. 1 and 6 RAR were involved.

 

PEACE KEEPING & PEACE MAKING OPERATIONS

(Somalia 1992-93, Rwanda 1994-95, Cambodia 1994-95, Papua New Guinea 1946 to 1975, East Timor 1999-2012, Bougainville 1994, The Solomon Islands 2000 -2013, all remaining deployments not covered by UN or above (Rhodesia, Uganda)

 

AUSTRALIAN BATTALION VI (AUSBAT VI) – Operation Tangier/Citadel 2002

3 RAR Kapyong Khronicle, Sydney, 2002

ISBN: TBA

3 RAR battalion group tour of duty in East Timor full colour pictorial, full nominal roll.

 

Commonwealth monitoring force Southern Rhodesia (OP DAMON)

Anonymous

In Australian Peacekeeper, Summer 2021, pp 36-39.

All RAR supplied members of this operation. A three-month unarmed deployment assisted with the transition of power to the new nation of Zimbabwe. Veterans of this deployment were awarded the Rhodesia Medal.

 

McDEVITT, Ben – Operation Helpem Fren: a personal perspective

In Australian Army Journal 2006, Volume III, No 2, Winter, pp 63-80. Author was a senior member of the operation which included elements of 1 and 2 RAR, including the latter’s HQ early in the deployments. An overview of Operation Anode, the ADF name for its contribution to this police-led multi-national mission.

 

SUTTON, David – Unwilling Spectators

Britain at War, Lincolnshire, 2020

ISBN: 9771753309122

Article published in journal Britain at War, Issue 157/2020 pp 76-85 on the Australian experience at the Kibeho massacre at which a platoon of 2 RAR played a vital role in reducing the scale of casualties that might have otherwise been suffered. 2/4 RAR is also mentioned in the wider context of this article.

 

IRAQ 2003-09 and 2014–ongoing

 

ARMSTRONG, Lieutenant Colonel Mark – Not hearts and minds: civil-military cooperation in OBG(W)–3

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VIII, No 1, Autumn, 2011, pp 63-74

The Australian Overwatch Battlegroup (West)-3 included about 515 personnel from 5 RAR. It provided operational overwatch to two Iraqi provinces in 2007. A small but important part of the battlegroup staff was a CIMIC (civil-military cooperation) team that supported the Commander with civil-military liaison and the planning of consent winning activities. This paper describes the CIMIC activity conducted to support battlegroup manoeuvre and identifies considerations for future tactical land commanders. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2011_1.pdf

 

GREENSHIELDS, (Major) JM – Lessons of a contemporary combat team commander

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VI, Number 2, 2009, pp 41-53.

The author, an RAAC officer deployed with Overwatch Battle Group (West) – 2 in Iraq from Nov 06 to Jun 07in Al Muthana and Dhi QHar Provinces. OBG(W) – 2 included troops from 5/7 RAR. He provides a personal perspective of his role as the commander of a combat team in that time.  Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2009_2.pdf

 

AFGHANISTAN 2006-2021

 

Afghanistan

Entire Wartime (Australian War Memorial), Issue No. 96 (Spring 2021). 72-page special edition devoted entirely to Australian operations in Afghanistan, including most RARs.

 

CONNOLLY, Colonel PJ – Counterinsurgency in Uruzgan 2009

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VIII, No 2, Winter, 2011, pp 9-34.

Covers the Mentoring and Reconstruction Task Force (MRTF-2 who replaced MRTF -1) in 2009. MRTF-2 included A Coy 1 RAR as Operational Mentoring and Liaison Team (OMLT-C) and A Coy 1 RAR as Combat Team Alpha (CT-A) respectively. This battle group handed over to Mentoring Task Force (MTF-1) in Feb 2010, MTF-1 based on 6 RAR. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2011_2.pdf

 

DEHNERT, Sergeant PA – Size matters: turning to small teams to succeed at counterinsurgency

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 3, Summer, 2010, pp 35-45.

Author addresses the small teams concept in warfighting including platoon housing operations in Afghanistan, based on his experiences with MTRF-1 which included his unit at the time – 7 RAR – in the period Oct 08 to Jun 09. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_3.pdf

 

FREWEN, John – Contested nation building: the challenge of countering insurgency in Afghanistan in 2007

In AAJ, Vol V, No 1, Autumn 2008, pp 19-37. A paper of Australian operations in Afghanistan with reference to the Reconstruction Task Forces (RTF), all of which had RAR sub-units and some commanded by an RAR HQ. Author served there in 2007, having previously commanded 2 RAR.

 

HAYES, (Major) Jason – Preparing our soldiers for operations within complex human terrain environments

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VI, Number 2, 2009, pp 103-116.

Author uses examples from his experiences in 1st Reconstruction Task Force (1 RTF) in Afghanistan from Sep 06 to Apr 07 to address his topic. 6 RAR and 5/7 RAR troops served in 1 RTF. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2009_2.pdf

 

PROUD, Captain Matt – The COIN environment

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VIII, No 1, Autumn, 2011, pp 23-38.

Examines the key role that junior commanders and soldiers play in the execution of force concepts necessitated by modern counterinsurgency warfare. Discusses experiences from platoon teams operating as part of Combat Team A (CT-A) – platoons from A Coy 1 RAR of the Mentoring and Reconstruction Task Force 2 (MRTF-2), in Afghanistan from June 2009 to February 2010. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2011_1.pdf

 

RICE, Captain Gareth – What did we learn from the war in Afghanistan?

In Australian Army Journal Vol 11, No 1, Winter edition, 2014, pp 6-20.

Covers the nature of mainstream operations in Afghanistan including COIN, and describes the RTF structures that were followed by the MRTFs, each of which were either based on RAR HQ or contained RAR sub-units. Gives prominence to IEDs with became the bane of both mounted and dismounted Infantry operations. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2014_1.pdf

 

Various authors – Afghanistan (Special edition of Wartime)

In Wartime, No 96, Spring 2021, Australian War Memorial, Canberra. Several papers addressing the war in Afghanistan some mentioning units/formations including RAR members.

 

WATSON, (Captain) Benjamin – Enhancing Platoon Groups: Adaption, diffusion and empowerment in land warfare

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VI, Number 2, 2009, pp 141 – 150

This article is about 7 Platoon, C Company 2 RAR which was part of Reconstruction Task Force – 3 who served in Afghanistan in the period Oct 07 to Apr 08. He identifies the unique ability a platoon group has to achieve success, and takes his experiences as a platoon group commander to show that doctrine and combined arms theory have a place in the modern complex battlespace. The article explains that the fundamental infantry platoon cannot be effective in Afghanistan without key enablers from all corps. It further details the importance of fostering relationships between corps to improve combat power and battlefield effectiveness. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2009_2.pdf

 

 

HUMANITARIAN/DEFENCE AID TO THE CIVIL COMMUNITY

(Civilian Humanitarian Disaster ops (incl Darwin 1975 and other cyclones and floods, overseas eg PNG, Indian Ocean, and lately, Border Operations, and DACC (non-disaster) eg Olympics and Commonwealth Games and other government support eg APEC, G20)

 

PEDERSEN, Peter – Darwin: a platoon commander’s experience

In Australian Army Journal, No 316, September 1975. Author’s account while serving with 5/7RAR in Cycle Tracey humanitarian relief operations. 6 RAR followed5/7RAR as the core component of Field Force Group Darwin.

 

 

FUTURE

(All post-deployment material since unit last deployed to a declared war/operational deployment)

 

ASHLEY, WO1, David – Adaptive Campaigning and the Need to Empower our Junior Leaders to Deliver the ‘I’m an Australian Soldier’ Initiative: A Continuing Challenge for the Commander and the RSM

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VI, Number 3, 2009, pp 33-38.

Mentions 1 RAR in an example as he provides the senior soldier’s of the Army (at the time) perspective on the Adaptive Army: The complexity of the future battlespace will consistently require more and more from our junior leaders. The more is our junior leader’s ability to apply their leadership and skills across all Five Lines of Operation and to transition very quickly between them as required by Adaptive Campaigning. This means they must fully commit to prevailing in one line while thinking about the next. More so than ever we must be aware of the need to shape and develop our people. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2009_3.pdf

 

BICKELL, Colonel Craig – Plan Beersheba: the combined arms imperative behind the reorganization of the Army

In Australian Army Journal Vol X, No 4, Summer Edition, 2013, pp 36-52.

Outlines the effects on the combat brigades within which all RARs sat at the time (2013). Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2013_4.pdf

 

BREEN, Bob and McCauley, Greg – The world looking over their shoulders – Australian strategic corporals on operations in Somalia and East Timor

Land Warfare Studies Centre, Canberra, 2008

ISBN: 9780642296856

197 pages.

LWSC Working Paper No 314. This book looks closely at Australian corporals at the cutting edge of Australian peace enforcement operations in Somalia and East Timor at the end of the twentieth century. It describes and analyses their experiences seeking those that will shape military operations in the twenty-first century. Directly about predominantly RAR junior NCOs, with long-term ramifications for all future operations. Accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/sp314theworldlookingovertheirshouldersbob_breen_greg_mccauley.pdf

 

CARROLL, Lieutenant Colonel Luke – Raising a female-centric Infantry battalion: do we have the nerve

In Australian Army Journal Vol 11, No 1, Winter edition, 2014, pp 34-56.

Addresses the issue of females in the Australian RAR (and other) battalions in the modern era, something only relatively adopted in the Regular Army despite international practice, especially in wartime. Addresses the Broderick Review into the subject, and the project guidance inherent in Pathways to Change. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2014_1.pdf

 

COLTON, Greg – Enhancing operational capability: making Infantry more deployable

In AAJ, Vol V, No 1, Autumn 2008, pp 51-56. This paper examines the role of Infantry at the time over the period Timor 1999 onwards where all RARs deployed in one form or another and recommends a range of process and deployment improvements. Author was serving in 3 RAR at the time.

 

CROSS, Major, Jack – The weight of the Australian Army’s cyber body armour

In Australian Army Journal 2020, Vol XVI, No 2, pp 49-61. This paper addresses the existing and developmental aspects of body armour worn by combat troops including those of the RAR. Valuable for comparing across past and current deployments and for projecting into the future. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/20780_Army-Journal-internal_WEB.pdf

 

DAVIES, Warrant Officer Class Two Kent – Who should drive in a motorised battalion?

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 35- 44.

This paper discusses who should best drive the Protective Mobility Vehicles (PMV) in battalions Affects all RARs, both those serving in deployments where PMV have already been used, and into the future. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_2.pdf

 

FIELD, Colonel Chris – Five challenges for Infantry: thinking about adaptation and change

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 33-40.

This paper addresses immediate challenges for the future of Infantry in light of LAND 400 -Combined Arms Fighting System and other innovations driving Army in the early 21st century while it including the RAR battalions were deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan and elsewhere. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_1.pdf

 

GILLESPIE, (Lieutenant General) KJ– The Adaptive Army Initiative

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VI, Number 3, 2009, pp 7-19.

Although RARs are not individually addressed in this vital paper, their parent 1st Division is. This paper is essential reading to understand the major change in Army in 2008 and how RARs among other units in the Army changed to a fundamentally different system of preparing for and deploying to war. Author, the Chief of Army says: The Australian Army’s success in force generation and preparation and the conduct of contemporary and future operations will be determined largely by its capacity to learn and adapt. Only through a continual cycle of reviewing and adapting in response to a changing environment will the Army retain its ability to fulfil its operational charter while also creating a culture that is capable of encouraging innovation and creativity. The ‘Adaptive Army’ initiative is more than a simple reorganisation. It is a cultural realignment that seeks to generate profound change in training, personnel management, knowledge management, learning cycles and, eventually, the Army’s culture. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2009_3.pdf

 

HAMMETT, J – We were soldiers once: the decline of the Royal Australian Infantry Corps?

In AAJ, Vol V, Number 1, pp 39-50. An assessment of the (under) use of Infantry primarily in Afghanistan and recommends improved use in future conflict. Accessible at https://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/0817_journal.pdf  

 

Kapyong Kronicle 2014

3 RAR

Regimental journal, 140 pages long covering activity for 2014. Accessible at https://ppcli.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/KapyongKronicle2014.pdf

 

MORRISON AO, Lieutenant General David – Army after Afghanistan

In Australian Army Journal, Vol IX, No 2, Winter 2012, pp 7-14.

An address to the Sydney Institute in February 2012 where the Chief Army (Morrison) speaks on the Army’ future after Afghanistan (2021). Mentions the three brigades in which the RARs are positioned. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2012_2.pdf

 

ORR, Lieutenant Rob – The history of the soldier’s load

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 67-88.

From the loads carried by the armies of antiquity to today’s forces, this article analyses soldier load carriage over two millennia. Historical misconceptions appearing in some military documents and literature regarding the context and weight of the soldier’s load are also discussed. The author looks at how, even with changes in logistic practices, technology and the very nature of warfare, the soldier is still a beast of burden and suggests that relying on improved load carriage logistical aides and changes to equipment may not be the answer to this age-old problem in the future. A subject dear to every RAR member’s heart.  Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_2.pdf

 

OWEN, William F – The universal infantry

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 3, Summer, 2010, pp 143-149.

Paper which proposes a universal infantry battalion model for the future. Applicable to all RARs.

Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_3.pdf

 

ROBISON, Private Cameron – Rat pack chat

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 57-66.

Author was serving in 2 RAR, deployed with Alpha Company on Operation ASTUTE at the time of writing this paper which applies to all RAR and others. Like almost everyone who has ever eaten a combat ration pack, he has an opinion, an especially informed one given his qualifications as a fitness instructor. Discussions are drawn from his own knowledge and experience in fitness, a vital attribute for RAR soldiers. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_2.pdf

 

RYAN, Alan – Putting your young men in the mud: change, continuity and the Australian Infantry battalion

Land Warfare Studies Centre, Canberra, 2003

ISBN: 0642295956

57 pages.

LWSC Working Paper No 124. The paper discusses the implications of the transition from relatively unskilled mass industrial-age infantry to the information-age specialists who dominate the modern battlespace. Oddly, these changes have not been reflected in a fundamental reassessment of the role of the battalion in the Army’s order of battle. The paper also examines the key historical influences on the employment of the infantry battalion in the modern period, including the ongoing and relentless decentralisation of tactical formations, the ever-increasing precision and the lethal nature of weapon systems, and the exponential growth and availability of battlespace communications. Applicable to all RAR battalions, and refers to 1, 2 and 3 RAR in examples. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/wp124-putting_your_young_men_in_the_mud_alan_ryan.pdf

 

SANDS, 2nd Lieutenant JB – The multi-purpose Infantry combat dog asset or liability?

In Australian Army Journal, No 316, September 1975. Addresses the use of dogs in war; most RARs deployed war dogs as trackers in Malaya and Vietnam, and may do so again in the future.

 

SCANLAN, Major Paul – Parachute capability still relevant to modern expeditionary operations?

In Australian Army Journal, Vol IX, No 3, Summer, 2012, pp 37-54.

Addresses the role of parachuting in future operations. Mentions 3 RAR in the discussion and uses examples of that unit’s training and capability. Accessible at  https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2012_3.pdf

 

SMITH, LTCOL Chris, DUUS, LTCOL Tony & WARD, LTCOL Simeon – Contemporary warfare, the utility of infantry, and implications for the Project Land 400 combined arms fighting system

In Australian Army Journal, Vol VII, No 2, Winter, 2010, pp 15-33.

This article examines the role of infantry in contemporary warfare and finds that a highly trained infantry capability is essential for contemporary warfare. Infantry must operate in concert with other arms and services, but at times will be required to operate independently from vehicles. The paper proposes a balanced force model based on a single type of infantry battalion and a single type of cavalry regiment or divided between more specialised reconnaissance cavalry and armoured personnel carrier regiments, with all forces designed to operate in combination with each other as well as independently. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/aaj_2010_2.pdf

 

STEVENSON, Robert C – Not-so friendly fire: An Australian taxonomy for fratricide

Land Warfare Studies Centre, Canberra, 2006

ISBN: 0 642 29638 3

65 pages.

LWSC Working Paper No 128. The paper contends that, based on Australia’s Vietnam experience, there are at least three different categories of fratricide. The first is accidental fratricide, which involves the active intent to kill the enemy but instead results in unforeseen and unintentional death or injury to friendly personnel. The second is military–industrial fratricide, which involves no enemy, but where the actions of friendly personnel result in death or injury to other friendly personnel. The third is calculated fratricide, which involves the active intent to kill the enemy or destroy their equipment or facilities but in a manner that consciously endangers friendly personnel. By seeing this problem as multidimensional, it is possible to demonstrate that, far from being an aberration, the infliction of fratricidal casualties by friendly fire is a constant and inevitable feature of military training and operations. 1 RAR is mentioned, and this issue affects all RARs. Accessible at https://researchcentre.army.gov.au/sites/default/files/wp128-not-so_friendly_fire_robert_stevenson.pdf